Item #51560 Signed Photograph and Other Material. Arthur Wergs Mitchell.
Signed Photograph and Other Material
Signed Photograph and Other Material
Signed Photograph and Other Material

Signed Photograph and Other Material

1937. The photograph is approx. 17.5 x 23 cm. mounted on a larger card mount. Waist length shot of the Congressman wearing a three-piece suit. Signed on photo ("Arthur W. Mitchell M.C. May 26, 1936"). Some marring in background where photo is spotted or gouged, but Mitchell's image is clear and unmarked. [Also included] (1) A Bill to Assure to Persons within the Jurisdiction of Every State the Equal Protection of the Laws, and to Punish the Crime of Lynching. [Washington: 1937]. 4p. pamphlet. Later folds. 75th Congress. 1st Session. H.R. 2251. [and] (2) The Democratic Party and the Negro: Speech of Hon. Arthur W. Mitchell of Illinois in the House of Representatives April 22, 1936. [Washington: n.d.]. 3p. Later folds. Reprinted from the Congressional Record. [and] (3) Lynching the Blackest Crime in America Today: Speech of Hon. Arthur W. Mitchell of Illinois in the House of Representatives Tuesday, May 19, 1936. [Washington]: n.d. 3p. Later folds. Reprinted from the Congressional Record. Mitchell was born near Lafayette, Alabama, on December 22, 1883. He attended Tuskegee Institute, and also studied at Columbia and Harvard. He founded the Armstrong Agricultural School in West Butler, Alabama. Mitchell turned his attention to the law, and after admission to the bar, eventually moved to Chicago, Illinois. He was the first African American to be elected to the U.S. Congress as a Democrat when he narrowly defeated Oscar De Priest in 1934.. He served four terms as an Illinois Congressman (1935-1943) and was the only African American in Congress during all four terms. Mitchell was a loyal supporter of FDR and the New Deal but was never an aggressive leader in the civil rights struggle. The lynching bill he introduced was criticized by the NAACP as too weak. He lost support from Democratic officials in Chicago on other issues and "voluntarily" decided not to run for re-election in 1942. William L. Dawson ran for his seat on the Democratic ticket and was elected to the first of fourteen consecutive terms. Mitchell bought some land in Virginia and spent time farming, lecturing, etc. He died in 1968 and was interred on his farm near Petersburg. Very Good. Item #51560
ISBN: B000NP4B70

Price: $500.00