Let My People Go. Lillian E. Wood.
Let My People Go
Let My People Go

Let My People Go

Philadelphia: A.M.E. Book Concern Printers, n.d. [1925]. 1st ed. Hardcover. 132p. Black cloth (rubbed). 22cm. Significant cover spotting. Extremities heavily rubbed (some loss of cloth. Former owner's name (E. P. Crutcher of Knoxville, Tenn.) in pencil on front free endpaper. Contents age-toned. Light stain and some rippling on upper portion of pages in last half of book Short tear in margin on one leaf. No jacket. A very scarce novel. Bob McComb, an African American boy from Mississippi, is befriended by white benefactors and sent to college in the north. He enlists in the army during World War I, rising to the rank of Captain. When he is wounded, he is nursed back to health by his true love from college. After the war, Bob witnesses a lynching in Mississippi, studies law in Chicago, goes back to the South, becomes involved in politics, and is elected to Congress on the Race Equality Party ticket, whereupon his eloquence causes Congress to pass an anti-lynching bill. Carla Kaplan's "Miss Anne in Harlem" (2013), using information in Wood's little known and unpublished autobiography which Kaplan had located, devoted most of an admiring chapter ("Let My People Go" Lillian E. Wood Passes for Black" at pages 59-82) in that book to Ms Wood and her book, revealing that, contrary to general belief, Wood was white, not African American -- an Ohio-born Miss Anne who spent 48 years (1907-1955) as teacher and librarian at Morristown College, an historically black higher education institution, in East Tennessee. Good. Item #88570

Price: $500.00

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